EV Guide

Vehicle Plug Types

Outlets, computers, smartphones, and now EVs. Wherever a new technology grows, multiple kinds of plug inevitably follow. We’re here to clear up the confusion so you always know how to charge.

Standard AC Charging

Type 1

Alternate names: J1772, SAE J1772

In New Zealand, this is the plug standard used by Mitsubishi and some pre-2018 EVs. It is the plug standard in North America and Japan.

The Type 1 plug has a five-pin design. Two pins are used as a mode of communication between the EV and charging stations, determining the maximum current available to the vehicle and preventing the car from moving while connected. The three remaining pins are used as AC lines for charging and a line to the ground.

Type 2

Alternate names: IEC 62196, Mennekes

In New Zealand, this plug standard is currently used by all other EV manufacturers. It is now the standard for New Zealand EVs.

The Type 2 plug has a seven-pin design. The addition of two extra pins allows these plugs to support three-phase charging. Type 2 is also the plug standard for all of Europe.

Rapid DC Charging

CHAdeMO

An abbreviation for “CHArge de MOve”, french for “move using charge”. It is used internationally by the Japanese brands Mitsubishi, Nissan and Toyota.

CCS Combo

CCS is short for combined charging system. It allows AC and DC chargers to use the same plug. CCS has two variants using Type 1 and Type 2 AC plugs. These standards are used by Volkswagen, BMW, Ford and Hyundai internationally.

Tesla Supercharger

Tesla Superchargers use the same design as Type 2 AC plugs. However, they’re able to deliver much more power by using two of the pins for DC current.

However, despite the shared plug design, Tesla Superchargers will only charge Tesla vehicles.

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